Menu Plan Monday: Tuesday Already Edition

Well, this isn’t the first time I’ve forgotten to upload my menu on Sunday evening (the time Org Junkie’s post goes up) or even Monday. But maybe you’re a menu procrastinator, too, or maybe you’re looking to swipe some ideas for next week.

Today’s also the last day of IComLeavWe for July; signups for August should be open tomorrow, and if you haven’t participated, I recommend it! I had a lot of fun reading new-to-me blogs, leaving comments, and getting acquainted with a few new folks. I’ve kept a blog in one form or another since 1999 (I think — the Wayback Machine doesn’t have all of it archived), but I’ve never been very good at expanding beyond real-life and forum friends in my blog reading. ICLW kicked me out into the wider world, and I liked it — so I say, even if you feel shy or like you “don’t  belong,” please sign up!

And now, le menu de la semaine:

  • Monday: Erm, what DID we eat? Oh yes, BLTs, potato chips, and hot fudge sundaes. Ahem. Very healthy, you know, what with the lettuce and tomato. Right?
  • Tuesday: Oven-baked breaded chicken tenders, crash hot sweet potatoes, and salad. (More on today’s dinner at the bottom of the post.)
  • Wednesday: Chicken Marsala, accordion potatoes, braised baby carrots with thyme.
  • Thursday: Fair food! Zack and I are planning to hit the Lenawee County Fair and eat funnel cake for dinner, which makes Monday’s dinner EVEN WORSE.
  • Friday: Zatarain’s (honestly, their jambalaya mix is tasty, even if it’s not really jambalaya) with chicken, salad, and fruit.
  • Saturday: Leftover chicken Marsala with pasta and perhaps other vegetables that need to be used up.
  • Sunday: Deli turkey, Stove Top stuffing, mashed potatoes, and gravy from a mix. Maybe with green beans and cranberry sauce, too. Because everyone needs cafeteria Thanksgiving dinner on a regular basis.

So about Tuesday’s dinner: The chicken tenders are quite easy; Meijer (the grocery chain here) sells chicken tenders for the same price per pound as whole boneless, skinless breasts (BSCB, as it were) — which is actually the same price as the bone-in kind. Anyway, not the cheapest thing, but sometimes we buy them anyway. Just pat them dry, dredge in seasoned flour, dip in an egg, then coat in breadcrumbs or more seasoned flour, put on a Pammed baking sheet and spritz the top with more Pam, and bake at 350F for 20-25 minutes.

Tonight’s seasonings featured salt, onion powder, smoked Spanish paprika, coriander, black pepper, chipotle powder, rosemary, Old Bay, and probably some other stuff. I sort of have this habit of looking through the spice cupboard and going “oh, that sounds like it’d go,” and adding it in, especially for stuff like chicken tenders where gourmet isn’t really one of the possible outcomes.

Now, the crash hot sweet potatoes. I decided to skip the parboil and put them straight into the oven, whence to be smashed and beseasoned. This did not work well and I recommend doing the parboiling recommended in the recipe. They were still tasty tasty, but kind of dry around the edges and not really “smashed” so much as “dented.”

Due to its general unattractive nature, there was no photographic evidence of tonight’s dinner; instead I present you with last Friday’s meatloaf, mashed potatoes, and green beans (tossed with olive oil, cumin, fenugreek and um… something else, and roasted in the oven at 450F).

BBQ meatloaf is for nomming

BBQ meatloaf is for nomming

Liveblogging Cookies: Samoas Bars and Tagalongs

 

Note: Firefox has earned my undying enmity for the day by refusing to let me upload pictures and/or really basically do anything useful at all. I am forced to use Internet Exploder. Please, shoot me.

I’m finally, finally making the Samoas bars and Tagalongs from Baking Bites. Actually, I started making them about 40 minutes ago, but due to technical issues I haven’t been able to start liveblogging about it until now. I’ve never done this before, and I don’t know what makes me think anyone will find it interesting now, but who knows: Maybe you’re stuck at the office on a Friday afternoon and would prefer cookie updates to actual work!

I won’t be posting the full recipes here, as you can find them at the links above, but I’ll post my metric conversions since I do all baking by weight. No measuring cups here, kthx. I’ve started with the Samoas bars, because I think they’ll need more cooling and setting up time to be ready for dipping in chocolate.

1:00pm – toasting the coconut. Excitement galore as I try to keep Noodle off the counter! The recipe calls for 3c of toasted coconut, but I’m using 1-1/2c, because it looks like enough to me (I prefer a higher cookie-to-topping ratio) and also because I’m cheap. All that was available at the store was sweetened shredded, which was another reason to use less (don’t want to rot anyone’s teeth out).

half-baked

half-baked

 1:20 – While the coconut was in the oven, I had to take it out every five minutes or so and give it a little stir to keep it from turning into burntonut. In the interim, I had lunch: Salsaria’s, a pretty OK local Mexican place, but the real reason to go there is the salsa. My bloodstream consists of 98% salsa and was in need of replenishment. I feel better now.

cookie dough fixins

cookie dough fixins

I also started to make the cookie dough for the Samoas bars. Baking Bites gives her recipe in volume, which is more familiar for most folks, but here’s the weight conversion for the dough:

100g sugar

170g butter

1 egg

1/2t vanilla (what, you think you can weigh that? ha!)

228g AP flour

1/4t salt

And as I typed this up, I just realized that I only put 1/2c. of butter in the dough, so whoops! My bad on that one. I’ll let you know how that error turns out. It might explain the slight dry-looking thing I’ve got going on. So, cream the butter and sugar, then add the egg and vanilla:

look at that lovely egg

look at that lovely egg

 I elected to go with the hand-held mixer, even though there are two KitchenAids available here; for small batches of stuff, I just find it to be less trouble, plus there’s something pleasingly retro about it. I never used a stand mixer growing up, so it reminds me of baking Christmas cookies with family. Anyway, next we add the flour, and stir just to combine. BB mentioned the dough might be crumbly, but I suspect yours should be less so, because you’ll use the right amount of butter. Right?

like chunky sand
like chunky sand

 OK, Internet Explorer? Is really annoying. Anyway, I figured that looked about like fairly moist pie dough, and turned it out into the only 9×13″ pan in the house: a Pyrex dish. We haven’t moved our stuff over yet and I was somewhat aghast at the lack of bakeware, but I shall remedy that shortly.

 

dough, patted in nicely
dough, patted in nicely

 You can sort of see there that the dough was a bit dry. Maybe I should’ve clued in. Oh well! It patted in pretty well, not too sticky, so I just used my hands (which run notoriously hot, particularly in the summer) and made it into an approximation of an even surface. If I were making these to sell, I’d have worried about leveling it off, but for cookies to eat at home? Meh.

Into the oven at 350F for about 23 minutes, and this is where we currently stand at 2pm. Now that I’m done wrestling with WordPress, it’s back into the kitchen to start on the Tagalong dough and filling, and maybe do a few more dishes.

cookie base, baked off (ft. coconut)
cookie base, baked off (ft. coconut)

2:25 – slight delay due to my having to, um, clean? the beaters. Yup. Just got done making the dough for the Tagalongs, shaping, and getting them into the oven. First up, the ingredients:

This time with more milk
This time with more milk

 So here we have:

1c butter (2 sticks)

100g sugar

228g AP flour

1/4t baking powder

1/2t salt

1/2t vanilla extract

2T milk

As is usual in these matters, first you cream the butter and sugar. Like so. While you blog about it, the oven will beep incessantly because IT thinks the cookies are done, but they are not.

vroom vroom
vroom vroom

Subsequently we add the dry ingredients, vroom it all together, then last the vanilla extract and milk. I might’ve put a little less milk, because it’s humid and my opinion is that the dough was a little bit too soft.

Tagalongs in dough formation
Tagalongs in dough formation
I was supposed to measure about a tablespoon and press them out 1/4″ thick or so, but the dough was sticky and I got frustrated and I just want to EAT THE COOKIES so I may have rushed it, resulting in this sloppy tray of cookies, ready to bake.
Sadly off-round cookies
Sadly off-round cookies
Another 350F-lover, this time only for 11-13 minutes; I found 13 minutes better, and shall provide you with photos momentarily.
 
It is now 2:48 (man, if only I’d had like, five recipes ready to go and hadn’t decided to blog this, I’d have a LOT more cookies by now). Here are the Tagalong cookie bases, hanging out in the oven, waiting for their grand appearance:
Toasty!
Toasty!
I must say the dough spread rather a lot more than expected. If I make these again, I think my inclination will be to use a slightly more traditional shortbread dough and/or to tighten up the recipe a little bit and do them as refrigerator cookies for speed and regularity of shape, as well as hopefully more minimal cookie-spreading. The dents are to allow the cookies to hold a maximum amount of peanut butter filling, which is up next.
 
dented goods aisle
dented goods aisle

3:24 and time for toppings! I tried to take a pic of the ingredients for the coconut-caramel Samoas topping, but somehow the peanut butter snuck in, and I was like, you know, nobody really needs to see a pile of unwrapped Milk Maid caramels. Instead, here’s what it looks like after melting the caramels, milk, and salt together:

caramel lake
caramel lake
And after stirring in the toasted coconut:
coconut goo
coconut goo
And finally, atop the cookie bar base (I left some of the edges a little barer for my own personal eating goodness).
on top of samoaaaas
on top of samoaaaas
I also mixed up the peanut butter filling for the Tagalongs, but the cookies aren’t quite cool enough yet. Once they’re topped, it’s just chill time and then dipping in chocolate. Oh, and I have to make meatloaf for dinner. I don’t think anyone wants liveblogging about meatloaf. You may now run off and get snacks, because I’ll probably let everything relax and chill for a couple of hours before dipping (mostly because MIL will be home soon and will need the kitchen to make dinner).
peanut butter, now with extra added sugar
peanut butter, now with extra added sugar

4:00 – I put the peanut butter on the delicious Tagalong bases and rather to my chagrin, I think I overbaked them a little. They’re quite crisp, and I’m afraid of what will happen when they hit the chocolate. I guess if worse comes to worst I can just use it as an ice cream topping — you know, the thing you do with all failed desserts, right?

5:00 – Since I only got one bag of chocolate chips, and apparently MILK chocolate chips at that, I decided to do the half-dip with the Samoas. Holy cow, dude; I can feel my teeth rotting. I can’t say I’m a huge fan and will probably not make them again, but instead use the recipe as a basis for a more grown-up version with a burnt caramel coconut topping, or something. Admittedly having sweetened coconut plus milk chocolate didn’t help their case for me, but ho. ly. cats, Batman. I haven’t dipped the Tagalongs yet and may pick up a bar of semisweet chocolate before I do so. I guess when you get down to it, I don’t like Girl Scout cookies as much as I think I do.

Oh — and my camera battery died, and the charger’s still at the old house. Oops. Sorry for no finished pics, but they look kind of not so hot anyway. An anticlimactic end to a cookie-baking day — and now I am going to go drink pickle juice to make up for all the sugar. If I do the “liveblogging” thing again, I’ll probably use a recipe I know. Or maybe video tutorials are more the thing. I really need a video camera. And now I’m rambling.

Signing off for now — if ever I get “finished product” photos (i.e. if Zack doesn’t eat all the cookies before I go get the battery charger), I’ll add them here! I’d say the recipes are definitely worth a try; I have a less-sweet tooth than most and overall they pretty much deliver the goods.

Recipe rating: B+ (points deducted for lack of weight measurements as well as being AMGSWEET; recommend NOT using sweetened coconut in the Samoas bars)

Here Kitty Kitty

As you may know, we have three (3) cats: Audrey, Isabella (hereafter and always in real life referred to as “Kitten,” which confuses everyone), and Noodle. One of the parts of moving that stressed me out the most was wondering how the cats would do.

I figured Noodle would be fine; we just adopted her in February, and within half an hour of getting home she was romping all over the house like she owned the place. Audrey is generally not a big fan of change, but is attached to me at the ankle, so I thought she might hide for a day or two and come out. Kitten is the one we worried about. She’s extremely shy; on a good day we only see her for a half an hour or so, because she’s usually off doing her own thing. Usually this involves exploring air ducts. When she was a baby, she got lost in the walls in my apartment for a few days, and also used to just hide under the dresser, occasionally climbing up into the drawers through the back. That always made for fun surprises.

Noodle, who did not, in fact, have catnip

Noodle, who did not, in fact, have catnip

In a turn of events which surprised nobody, Noodle sort of sniffed around for maybe fifteen minutes and then commenced galloping through the house. (Aside: I love cat-galloping, because they manage to look really elegant from the side and like total goofuses from behind.) She lives to be snuggled, kissed, and petted, and is being completely and totally spoiled. When my mother-in-law gets home from work, Noodle is there at the door, and MIL obligingly picks her up, holds her, talks to her, and pets her, all the while cooing about how freaking CUTE she is. And it’s true. She’s very cute. So cute I’m not sure it’s actually physically possible. A little later, my father-in-law gets home and we repeat the process, and then Zack. Lather, rinse, repeat. She isn’t supposed to be allowed in my MIL’s office/study area, but it seems last night she cuted her way in and hung out for a couple of hours. She also charmed the electrician with her general nutso antics.

Noodle Transition Report: A+

Audrey, queen of all she surveys

Audrey, queen of all she surveys

(I have no idea why WordPress wants the caption there to be bolded, but I’ve removed and reinserted the image like five times now, so I think it must Mean Something.) Next up, we have Audrey. When I adopted Audrey, she was already two years old, and surly. She’s still surly; it’s sort of her raison d’etre. Anyway, after I brought HER home from the shelter, she alternately lounged on my lap and hid in the upright piano. After a week or so she was willing to follow me around but never got more than four or five feet away, and four years later it’s pretty much the same. She does actually spend a good third of her day out of line of sight of me, though. When we got here, she did the cat-slink, found her way under the couch, and stuck there for a few hours. Late at night she started exploring the various chair options before finding that the blue wing chair, above, suited her needs. This house has many more chairs than our old place, so during the day she tests other locations but generally comes back to Blue Wing Chair. She also digs the fact that the bed is rightnextto the computer, so she can lounge by my elbow while I work. MIL wants to know why Audrey talks so much, and I just kind of make a gesture that says “I’ve been telling you for three years this is the cat that never shuts up.”

Audrey Transition Report: A

Kitten, wearer of stripey pajamas

Kitten, wearer of stripey pajamas

That brings us to Kitten. We worried pretty much from the moment we knew we were moving about how she would react, and tried to talk to her about how fabulous the new place would be, what with all the extra windows and furniture under which she could hide. Which is exactly what she did: We got her here, opened the carrier, and whoosh, under the buffet she went. She stayed there for a few hours until she judged it safe to move elsewhere, and then vanished. Apparently she’s found a way into the ceilings via the laundry room — we’ve seen her exiting said hiding place. But here’s the sort of awesome part. Late at night, she comes upstairs and roams around freely, even going so far as to jump on the couch with me (this is not a thing that happens in Kitten-land) and demand pets. Last night she ran around meowing and trilling at everything for a good hour and a half, which was hilarious. She also spends a good deal of time rolling vigorously on the floor. I am totally surprised that she’s adjusted so very well, and while she still plays hidey-cat most of the time, she’s been more interactive than ever. Really, that’s the entire reason for this post, because it makes me smile to see her being so bold… and so silly.

Kitten Transition Report: A++ would buy again

Noodle and Otte

Noodle and Otter

Family Dinner

We had spaghetti and meatballs tonight, because last night we had, instead, a Small Breakdown Incident wherein I bawled because I couldn’t have fish or the sandwich I wanted, which has pushed all the menu stuff back by a day. But that’s OK, right?

Instead of spaghetti, we had bowties, and instead of meatballs, we had augmented Ragu. They were supposed to be meatballs, but I overcrowded the pan and said forget it. Also starring: Green leaf lettuce with blue cheese dressing; day-old Jimmy John’s bread with butter, garlic, and a nice stay in the oven. Not pictured: Bell’s Kalamazoo Stout.

Stout rating: B+.

spaghetti and meatballs

"spaghetti" and "meatballs"

Welcome to ICLWers!

For folks who are stopping by for the first time as a result of ICLW, welcome! I mostly blog about food, more food, and cats, but occasionally mention our struggles with infertility. My husband and I have been TTC since October 2007, and I’ve been working on a post about the dreaded Taking a Break, because it’s just not working for my sanity right now. Meanwhile, please relax and enjoy some recipes, and I’m glad you’re here. I love comments!

Fried Rice: A Basic Strategy

Simple Fried Rice

Simple Fried Rice

Ah, fried rice. So temptingly delicious I end up ordering it with meals half the time, and then being sorry, because really I’d rather just have plain white rice if I’ve got a saucy dish. The problem with fried rice in this town is that it sucks — it tastes like they fried it in months-old deep fryer oil, and nobody wants to taste that. What to do, then?

Fortunately we eat a lot of rice here. I go through enough of it that I used to buy the 20lb-ish bags when I lived alone. And there really isn’t much easier than fried rice, plus it’s much better than leftover, cold, half-dried-out gross white rice for lunch or dinner the next day. Technically you can prepare rice just to make fried rice, but then you have to dry it in the oven. Better, I think, to use it for what it is: A leftovers catchall.

Once you have the basic technique down, you can make fried rice with just about anything, even ketchup; look up omuraisu if you doubt me. I nearly always use an egg in mine, because it’s my favorite part. Try vegetables, chopped up leftover meat (rotisserie chicken, anyone?), any seasonings you’ve got around, even fruit that might be slightly past its eating-raw prime. (I’m getting to the recipe; I just want to instill confidence. Especially if you’re watching your grocery budget, just use what you have. It will almost definitely be good, unless you go with, like, plums and cheese or something.)

Here’s the version I made today, which I will call

Beef Fried Rice with Sesame and Spice (see, it rhymes!)

pantry raid

pantry raid

First, get your ingredients. At the very minimum you need oil and cooked rice. Supposedly you should only use long grain, but since we mostly eat Japanese short-grain rice, that’s what I use, and I say it’s tasty in its own chewy fashion. I also tend to add garlic and onion no matter what, as well as the aforementioned egg. Here I also have gyudon leftovers (I just used some of the beef), soy sauce, sesame oil, and sambal oelek (a hot chile paste).

If you don’t have or don’t feel like soy, sesame, and chiles, try miso, dashi, and a little sugar. Or ketchup. No, really. It tastes totally different when it’s cooked on high heat. Maybe coconut milk and fish sauce with curry powder and pineapple chunks? I have not tried chocolate syrup but now that I think of it, I might give dessert fried rice a spin.

The important point here is that (a) you like the flavors you’re putting together and (b) that you get everything ready before you heat the pan up; like most stir-frying, this needs to go fast once the s**t hits the pan. Ha, ha.

sunny orange egg

sunny orange egg

Really, this is just a gratuitous picture of the wonderful eggs we get from a friend. See the nice, dark yellow yolk? See the irony of the pheasant bowl? Mmm. This concludes your “buy local, free range eggs from chickens who get to eat bugs and stuff” PSA. So crack the egg into a bowl, and mix it up as you would for any scrambled egg:

action shot

action shot

Get out your cutting board and knife and mince up some onion and garlic; I used one small onion and one clove of garlic for about 2 cups of rice, because that’s what I felt like doing. The onions are actually cut smaller than this photo would have you believe. They’re just still stuck together. Do you all know the onion-dicing trick? If not I should put up some pictures. At this point I also chop up whichever meats and other vegetables I might be using, if any; they don’t all go into the pan at the same time, but I assume the best of you, dear readers, and know that you can separate them out as needed. Though I will add that if you chop them on the cutting board in order of pan-addition, it makes the sorting much easier later.

beef, onion, and garlic

beef, onion, and garlic

Get everything over by the stove. Ready? Put the pan on medium-high heat; a nonstick is nice for cleanup purposes. Obviously a wok would do well, but I don’t have one (I KNOW, OK?) so it’s OK to use what you have. Once it’s hot, add a little bit of oil and tilt to coat. I always do hot pan, cold oil, because it was drilled into my head at the restaurant. Someday I’ll look up the science of that, if there is any, and report back. Pitch the eggs in and scramble. I like to let it cook as a kind of big, thin egg pancake, because I like big pieces, but you can do as you please. Once they’re cooked, remove them to a bowl (I just put them back in the same bowl, since they get cooked again at the end, a little) and set to the side.

oni-on

oni-on

Here is where I generally crank the heat and add more oil to the pan. I may have gone slightly overboard here; you can get away with a little less, but don’t be stingy. This is a combination of canola oil with a hit of sesame. Once it’s good and hot, put the onions and garlic in and stir fry. I kind of like the taste of slightly-burnt garlic in fried rice, but if you don’t, you can do the onions first, then the garlic. Cook for a few minutes, until they start to brown, then add the rice.

P1040085

like white on?

Stir lots, at this point; you do not want any chunks of rice all globbed together, and you want to coat each grain nicely with oil. Stir stir stir. After a second, add your seasonings; in my case, soy and sambal oelek. Keep stirring until it starts to smell good. It’ll stick to the pan a little bit, but that’s good — you get caramelized brown bits of yummy wok hay, sorta. Just make sure it keeps moving so it doesn’t burn, and you’re good to go. Usually it takes about three to four minutes. Near the end, add your meat (if it’s already cooked — I should’ve mentioned, if it’s not, to add it with the vegetables at the beginning) and the egg, and stir around for a minute more.

stir stir stir!

stir stir stir!

Now you’re done, and really all you need to do is transfer your rice onto some kind of serving plate (I prefer a bowl, but I would almost always rather eat everything with a bowl and a spoon; I’m not sure if that means I’m lazy, or if I’m just at the forefront of the next culinary revolution somehow) and eat. You can also add some fresh herbs or lime juice at this point if you’d like a little pick-me-up in flavor.

that's some yellow egg

that's some yellow egg

Oh, what, you wanted a less-verbose version? Here’s an attempt:

  • Chop some vegetables, onion, garlic, and/or meat.
  • Whisk an egg.
  • Heat a pan on medium-high heat, add canola or peanut oil, scramble egg; transfer egg to bowl.
  • Turn the heat up a bit; add more oil, your onion, garlic, raw meat, and vegetables. Stir-fry until brown.
  • Add your leftover rice and stir stir stir so it gets all coated and doesn’t stick, then add your seasonings. Keep stirring for a few minutes. Really, you can tell by smell when it’s good and done.
  • Add the egg back, as well as any other precooked ingredients. Stir fry a few minutes more.
  • Place in bowl. Eat!

Gyudon: Rice Bowl with Beef and Onions 牛丼

gyudon my way

gyudon my way

Ah, gyudon. This is one of those recipes that’s so easy it shouldn’t even really be one, but chances are most of my blog readers have never eaten it. I think of it as being a sort of Japanese “brown food” — you know, like American hot shots and burgers and other things that usually arrive with gravy. Comforting, easy, and nothing challenging about making OR eating the stuff. Before we proceed, I should note that the picture above is pretty much entirely wrong, because it shows the way I like to eat my gyudon: soupy. Here’s a more typical looking presentation:

gyudon, the normal way

gyudon, the normal way

There are, of course, many variations on the basic methods; there’s an entire restaurant chain devoted to gyudon (both in Japan and now in America, too), so you can imagine. But here’s how I make it, with notes on my standard deviations.

Gyudon / 牛丼

serves 2

  • Cooked short-grain white rice — however much you think you might like to eat; 1c uncooked is usually good for us.
  • 3c weak dashi; the making of dashi is another topic, but know that I normally cheat and use instant dashi granules, like so:

  • 1/2c soy sauce; I prefer Kikkoman from Japan, which comes in big huge bottles at the Japanese grocery store.
  • 1/4c mirin, a sweetened rice wine, also from the Japanese market
  • 1/2c sake
  • 2T sugar
  • 1/3lb. beef; pick a cut with some fat.
  • 3 onions, sliced
  • bunch of green onions, sliced, optional
  • beni shoga, the red matchstick shaped pickled ginger, optional
  • shichimi togarashi, a Japanese seasoning powder, optional
  • kimchi, totally optional because it’s not at all even remotely traditional

If you haven’t already, make your rice; my neuro fuzzy from Zojirushi gets it cooked in about the same amount of time it takes to make the rest of dinner.

Next, the broth. You’ll probably note that I use a lot of broth for this, which is because I like to put lots of broth in my bowl, and then eat the rest as soup the next day. You could probably get away with half the quantity or possibly less. Mix together the dashi, soy, mirin, sake, and sugar, and bring to a simmer on the stove. Meanwhile, slice the onions (for Japanese cooking I almost invariably chop off the poles, cut in half pole to pole, and then make slices pole to pole; it does make an important difference in the texture). Once the broth is simmering, add the onions and let them cook for a few minutes. If you have green onions, use them; they add a lot of flavor. Put them in with the other onions to simmer. If you don’t, as I didn’t, just go on and try not to cry.

Meanwhile, back at HQ, slice your beef as thin as possible. I usually cut across the grain with the knife at about a 30 degree angle from the cutting board, but this was a bad job; it’s much easier if the meat is mostly frozen, and this wasn’t at all, plus I am a Bad Knife Owner and must sharpen. You want yours as thin as you can possibly get it. You can buy it pre-sliced at Asian markets, usually. Note: I also like gyudon made with ground beef, so there’s always that possibility, too!

Add the beef to the simmering onions, and simmer about another 5-10 minutes, or until you’re ready to eat.

Place a nice helping of your cooked rice into a bowl, then top with beef, onions, and some of the broth if you like. Ideally at this point you’ll also add a little beni shoga, and sprinkle with shichimi togarashi. If you have just moved and forgotten half your ingredients elsewhere, you can eat it plain, or top with kimchi or takuan or really anything at all.

I keep the leftover broth, and the next day mix an egg together then place it in the boiling broth to cook. I eat it on top of rice — bonus! Two meals for the price of one!

Please let me know if you try this. It’s really good, and if you (or your kids) like teriyaki there’s a good chance this will become a favorite, as well.